Can there be science without fantasy? Part 3

The unfortunate subject of politics Advances in real world technology and medicine add detail to the understanding of the human mind. However, has society ignored the need to develop individuals and given them technology instead? It could be why people are so willing to give control up to technology, for example in the many instances […]

Book review of ‘Snakewood’ by Adrian Selby

This is a densely-written novel, whose rhythmic narrative is as much of an accomplishment as the convincing world-building; the latter detailed with such invention you forget it’s not, in fact real. Links to our realm – stupid attitudes towards refugees, the desperate politics of smaller countries who want to go their own way without some […]

Can there be science without fantasy?

From the Innominate Eastercon panel ‘Fantastic Lessons for Scientists’ on 15 April 2017, with Adrian Tchaikovsky, Aliette de Bodard, TJ Berg, Christianne Wakeham & Dr Justin Newland PART 1: We are all special The word ‘fantasy’ is derived from the Greek ‘phantasia’ and means ‘to make visible’. This definition immediately places the magical genre in […]

New Ashel 5 art from ‘The Outer Spheres’

I think and write in a visual way because: I was a screenwriter and one needs to, especially when physical directions are minimal and the characters are lying It’s useful when clarifying projects, whether they are creative or not – in fact especially if they’re not I cannot draw and openly envy anyone who can […]

Review of ‘The Enclave’ by Anne Charnock

    There just isn’t anyone else writing like Anne Charnock. Her exquisitely-crafted short novels are like super-distilled iced vodka, clear, compulsive and with a kick that comes later. You also don’t need much to get off your head. In this one, part of a series of four novellas by different authors published by NewCon […]